Survival International accuses WWF and WCS of supporting violence against indigenous people in the Congo Basin

Survival International accuses WWF and WCS of supporting violence against indigenous people in the Congo Basin

National parks, logging concessions and trophy hunting zones have been imposed on vast areas of land in the Congo Basin. A new report by Survival International documents how the World Wildlife Fund and the Wildlife Conservation Society have played a key role in this carve up of indigenous peoples’ lands.

The report, titled “How will we Survive?” is available here.

In the name of conservation, indigenous peoples have been evicted from their land. They are accused of “poaching”, even though they are hunting to feed their families. They are even accused of poaching when hunting outside protected areas.

>> Click here for the full article on conservation-watch.org

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What works? Protected areas, indigenous territories, and conservation concessions in Peru

What works? Protected areas, indigenous territories, and conservation concessions in Peru

State-controlled protected areas (PAs) have dominated conservation strategies globally, yet their performance relative to other governance regimes is rarely assessed comprehensively. Furthermore, performance indicators of forest PAs are typically restricted to deforestation, although the extent of forest degradation is greater.

Thus starts a recent paper in Nature. The paper aims to address these shortfalls in the research, “through an empirical impact evaluation of state PAs, Indigenous Territories (ITs), and civil society and private Conservation Concessions (CCs) on deforestation and degradation throughout the Peruvian Amazon”.

Worldwide, there are 202,467 protected areas. This number has expanded rapidly over the past decades. And governments have committed to ambitious targets to expand protected areas further. Yet the conversion and degradation of tropical forests continues.

>> Click here for the full article on conservation-watch.org

Survival International abandons OECD mediation with WWF

Survival International abandons OECD mediation with WWF

Survival International has abandoned its OECD complaint that the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) funded human rights abuses in Cameroon.

Survival International made the complaint in February 2016. The OECD accepted the complaint at the beginning of 2017. The OECD set up a mediation between Survival International and WWF on 6-7 July 2017, in government offices in Bern. Since then talks had continued, but on 5 September 2017 Survival International pulled out.

In an article about the breakdown in talks, Stephen Corry, Survival International’s director, describes the complaint:

The complaint detailed Survival’s allegations that WWF was party to the theft and control of the lands of Baka “Pygmies” in Cameroon, and that the Baka were suffering catastrophic levels of abuse as a result. We said that WWF had made no attempt either to apply its own policy on indigenous peoples, or to abide by the OECD guidelines, which are designed to prevent human rights abuses arising from corporate activities.

>> Click here for the full article on conservation-watch.org

Batwa boy shot dead in Kahuzi-Biéga National Park, DRC

Batwa boy shot dead in Kahuzi-Biéga National Park, DRC

A Batwa boy has been shot dead by eco-guards at the Kahuzi-Biéga National Park, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. He was with his father gathering medicinal herbs on ancestral lands. His father was shot in the arm, but managed to escape.

The father, Munganga Nakulire, and his son, Christian Mbone Nakulire, were carrying only machetes. They were shot at by eco-guards from the Congolese Institute of Nature Conservation (ICCN) on 26 August 2017.

>> Click here for the full article on conservation-watch.org

Urgent request for intervention against violent Maasai evictions in Tanzania: “Losing the land would mean losing everything”

Urgent request for intervention against violent Maasai evictions in Tanzania: “Losing the land would mean losing everything”

For the past nine days, Tanzanian rangers have been carrying out violent evictions of Maasai pastoralists from their land in Loliondo, to the east of the Serengeti National Park. Houses have been burned, people arrested, and food and property destroyed.

A company called Otterlo Business Corporation, which has links to the royal family of Dubai, has exclusive hunting rights on 4,000 square kilometres of land to the east of the Serengeti National Park. OBC wants to create a “protected area” on 1,500 square kilometres – this is the area where the evictions are taking place.

Susanna Norlund has issued an “Urgent Request for Intervention” against the evictions in Loliondo, on her blog, View from the Termite Mound (available here).

>> Click here for the full article on conservation-watch.org

 

Violent evictions of Maasai underway in Loliondo, Tanzania to make way for Otterlo Business Corporation’s hunting concession

Violent evictions of Maasai underway in Loliondo, Tanzania to make way for Otterlo Business Corporation’s hunting concession

On 13 August 2017, rangers started to evict people and livestock from 1,500 square kilometres of land in Loliondo, Northern Tanzania. Houses and bomas (homesteads) have been burned. The evictions are taking place during an extreme drought.

A hunting company from the United Arab Emirates, Otterlo Business Corporation, has exclusive hunting rights in an area of 400,000 hectares to the east of the Serengeti National Park. For many years, OBC has been lobbying the Tanzanian government to turn the 1,500 square kilometre area, into a “protected area”. This is the area in which OBC organises its hunts.

In November 2016, OBC put out a report titled “Loliondo GCA Is Diminishing”. The report states that,

As a result of environmental destruction and human intrusion some animal species like cats, lions and buffalos disappeared and/or very difficult to find. This has adversely impacted on the hunting activities, especially the quality of trophies and their availability.

>> Click here for the full article on conservation-watch.org

Book review: The Big Conservation Lie

“Hero worship in conservation is as old as wildlife conservation itself. The subjects of this worship are invariably white men and women who are lionized for taking to a life of selfless service of the wilderness and its residents.”

This comes from John Mbaria and Mordecai Ogada’s book “The Big Conservation Lie“. The book is a must read for anyone interested in conservation. It raises serious questions about the way conservation is currently carried out in Kenya and in the rest of Africa.

Mbaria and Ogada describe a small cabal of exclusively white conservationists and conservation thinkers in Kenya. They don’t hesitate to name these conservation heroes in exposing the role they have played in creating “the mess the country faces today in regard to wildlife conservation”.

>> Click here for the full article on conservation-watch.org