India’s Kaziranga national park and the Streisand effect

India’s Kaziranga national park and the Streisand effect

The controversy over Kaziranga National Park’s brutal anti-poaching policy continues. Over the past 20 years, 106 people have been killed in the park in north-east India. Shockingly, almost half of those people were killed in the past five years.

In February 2017, the BBC’s South Asia correspondent, Justin Rowlatt, reported from Kaziranga. Rowlatt’s reports were titled “Killing for Conservation” and “Kaziranga: The park that shoots people to protect rhinos”. The National Tiger Conservation Authority’s response was to ban the BBC from all of India’s tiger reserves for the next five years.

>> Click here for the full article on conservation-watch.org

Advertisements

BBC banned from filming in Kaziranga and all of India’s tiger reserves for five years

BBC banned from filming in Kaziranga and all of India’s tiger reserves for five years

In February 2017, the BBC visited Kaziranga National Park in north east India. Justin Rowlatt, the BBC’s South Asia correspondent, reported that “Kaziranga is a triumph of wildlife conservation.”

The number of rhinos in Kaziranga has grown from just a handful a century ago when the park was established, to more than 2,400 today. But Rowlatt also reported on Kaziranga’s dark side: the park’s ruthless anti-poaching strategy. Fifty people have been killed in the past three years.

DNA India reports that the BBC and Rowlatt are now banned from filming in tiger reserves in India for the next five years.

>> Click here for the full article on conservation-watch.org

Open letter requesting that India’s Forest Rights Act is implemented and its integrity upheld

Open letter requesting that India’s Forest Rights Act is implemented and its integrity upheld

When India’s Forest Rights Act was passed in 2006, it was intended support the rights of communities to live in and from their forests. The Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006 legally recognised the right of communities to manage forests and their land.

Continue reading “Open letter requesting that India’s Forest Rights Act is implemented and its integrity upheld”

Prakash Kashwan on inequality, democracy and protected areas

Prakash Kashwan on inequality, democracy and protected areas

Prakash Kashwan is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Connecticut. In a new paper published in Ecological Economics, Kashwan investigates the relationship between inequality, democracy and the establishment of protected areas.

Continue reading “Prakash Kashwan on inequality, democracy and protected areas”